A day in Cadiz | A wonderful coastal Andalusian town 

Castle of San Sebastian Cadiz
Castle of San Sebastian Cadiz
Cadiz Market and the food stalls
Cadiz Market and the food stalls
Why Cadiz?

Our day trip to Cadiz was part of our New Years trip to Seville and as Cadiz was only a train ride away we decided to visit.   Our trip to Cadiz was inspired by Rick Stein and his Long Weekends TV series.   Rick visits some really cool restaurants and our plan was to seek them out as well as visiting the more well known sights of this wonderful Andalusian town. 

How did we get to Cadiz.

We travelled to Cadiz from Seville and we chose to travel by train.

You can buy train tickets really easily from the machines at most large city stations.  The ticket machines are really easy to use and you can access the information in several languages and pay by card which makes it so simple and hassle free.  

The trains to Cadiz from Seville ran every few hours throughout the day and the journey was only around 1hr 30 mins so it was perfect for a day trip. 

The Train cost approx €15.  Not bad for a day at the coast.

You could always drive down if you had a hire car which takes a similar time to the train.  I’ve popped the directions here. 

Train from Seville
What is there to see and do in Cadiz?
Cadiz Cathedral

Cadiz Cathedral, or la Catedral Nueva (the new cathedral), is located 40 m above sea level and its large towers are visible from almost anywhere in the city.   It was built in the 18th century in the High Baroque style and took over a century to build.   It really is an impressive building. 

Looking down to the cathedral
The Bell Tower of Cadiz Cathedral
The Tavira Tower

Cádiz is known worldwide for its watchtowers. They are witness to the trade and prosperity which the city experienced in the 18th century. At this time, the Tavira Tower the official watchtower of Cádiz due to the fact that it is situated in the centre of town, and was also the highest point in the town at 45 meters above the sea level.

Don Antonio Tavira was the first watchman of the tower and used his telescope to see the ships full with goods coming from America. Today the Camera Obscura enables visitors to observe Cádiz and its development in the 21th century.

We loved the camera obscure as it gave us a really cool view of Cadiz.

Prices for the camera obscure and entrance to the tower 

Normal Price: 7,00 Euro
Reduced price: 5,50 Euro, for:

  • People over 65.
  • Students with student ID.
  • Large Family.
  • Groups with more than 10 persons*
  • Disabled people.
The Cadiz skyline from the tower
The Cadiz skyline from the tower
The Cadiz skyline from the tower
The Cadiz skyline from the tower
San Sebastian Castle & Santa Catalina Castle

These two castles, both key parts of the city walls.  They stand on either side of La Caleta beach.

The fortress of Santa Catalina, entered directly from the promenade, was constructed in the 17th century. Its small chapel and a central patio planted with palms give it the sun-baked look of a Mexican mission. The castleis now a cultural center where open-air concerts are held in summer. San Sebastián Castle however is an imposing fort on a small island connected to the mainland by a long stone causeway.

This site is popular among locals and visitors as a pleasant place to walk for a cool breeze.  On the day we were there in December there was more cool breeze than we wanted and my teeth were chattering with the cold.   It wasn’t long before we got off the causeway and headed for a coffee. 

At the edge of Castle San Sebastian
At the edge of Castle San Sebastian
The causeway to the castle
The causeway to the castle
The Roman Amphitheatre of Cadiz & Barrio del Popolo 

Barrio del Popolo is one of the 3 archways that lead into the El Polopo area of Cadiz which encapsulates most of the historical area of the city.  Within it you’ll find the Roman Ampitheater which was build around 70BC for a friend of Julius Caesar, Lucius Cornelius Balbo and his nephew Balbo hence the theatres name of Teatrum Balbi. 

Unfortunately it was closed on the day we visited but will definitely be somewhere we’d head for on our return visit to Cadiz. 

The Theatre is free to enter and is right by the sea so in a fantastic location. 

A peek into the Roman Amphitheatre
A peek into the Roman Amphitheatre
Barrio del Popolo Cadiz
Barrio del Popolo Cadiz
The Market – Mercado Central

Cádiz’s central food market is a fascinating and illuminating place to spend a few hours.  Some 170 stalls offer the full range of local ingredients, from superb fruit and vegetables to charcuterie and cheeses, as well as fabulous fish. After browsing and buying, enjoy a glass of wine and tapas at the market bar.

We were really excited to visit this market but when we passed by in the morning it was closed so were fully prepared to miss this fantastic location however on our return later in the day it was overflowing with local people, out for their Sunday  walk and buying fruit, veg, cheeses, meats and having wine and street food and a really enjoyable time.   So we joined right in. 

Rick Stein had highlighted a prawn fritter type thing in his TV programme and Chris was keen to try it.  Little live prawns are scooped up into the batter then popped into the deep fat fryer.  The fritters are then devoured eyes and all.  Not for me really but I did have a nibble and it was actually ok, but I only had a nibble.   I opted for paella, well I was in Spain and I can tell you, it was delicious.   Our street food, coupled with a few glasses of wine was the perfect way to end our day in Cadiz before heading for the train home. 

Chris's prawn fritter Cadiz Market
Chris's prawn fritter Cadiz Market
Paella stall at Cadiz market
Paella stall at Cadiz market
Andiamo Amigos and the Food of Cadiz 
Ultrama & Nos 

Above we told you all about the little fried prawn fritters in the market place and the paella however we had stopped for lunch earlier in the day.  The restaurant we hunted down that had been  recommended by Rick Stein was Ultramar & Nos.  This restaurant had as the most amazing Tuna and Chickpea stew that the locals raved about and true to form, when we arrived the place was filled with locals all having their Sunday traditional stew.   It was delicious and I chose some tacos as my lunch and washed that down with a lovely big glass of red wine.   Thanks Rick, this place was great and we would recommend this to anyone visiting Cadiz.

Tuna & Chickpea Stew, Ultramar & Nos
Tuna & Chickpea Stew, Ultramar & Nos
Tacos at Ultramar & Nos
Tacos at Ultramar & Nos
Related posts you may like:
Plaza de Espana Seville

Seville, Spain | Tapas and culture, a great combination

Seville is the capital of the Andalusia area and seemed to offer all the thinsgs Chris and I love in an adventure.  Food, culture, good local transport links and of course Seville is the setting for Chris’s favourite opera, Carmen.  It was perfect and absolutely lived up to its reputation. 

Read More »

1 thought on “A Day in Cadiz | A wonderful coastal Andalusian town”

Leave a Reply